Hyperlink Challenge

For this week’s reading response, I wanted to try taking a different creative direction. I really liked the idea we discussed in class of the hyperlink poem, but I also wanted to take it a few different directions. So below there is the original ‘poem’ I wrote (as part of a collection of microfictions I’m working on), a hyperlinked version of the poem, and a version of the poem where each word has been replaced by the first definition/explanation/identifier the OED offers for that word. I am using the OED because I have extended scholarly background with the OED, and my personal ethnicity is Anglo-American, so I thought having a predominantly British English dictionary behind my own very American writing might be an interesting nod to my personal cultural background. This approach also reminded me of some of the questions of legibility, identity, and cultural background we discussed in class. If my ‘poem’ speaks to my personal identity, what does it mean that the politically and ethnically specific culture that helped to shape my personal identity are ‘hidden’ yet accessible behind each word I use? How ‘legible’ am I making those politicized identity-informers? Legible to whom? I hope that this exercise might help investigate some of those questions, or at least provide a curious endeavor into experimentalism.

As a disclaimer, the spacing was completely ruined when I transferred the poems here, so please bear with me as I try to make the different voices clear! Originally different voices were indicated with indents and spacing, but didn’t transfer. So I cheated a bit and just made the two voices alternate by paragraph (paragraph 1=voice 1, paragraph 2=voice 2, paragraph 3=voice 1, paragraph 4=back to voice 2, etc.). And I have no idea why the font size changes, and no clue how to fix it.

Original:

*virtual hugs*

*virtual snuggles*

*virtual cuddles* *virtual kisses* *virtual blanket bundles* *virtual “hey give me some sheets”* *virtual “hey can you scoot over”*

are you the sheet hog or me I can’t remember

we alternate

good equality in all things even in unequal distributions of blanket

#comrades #denofthieves capitalism’s distribution of blankets is uneven we live in the world we create a blanket bundle is a naked manifestation of what marx’s conceptualizations of primitive accumulation thieving blankets is not only the most morally tenable option – it is the only way to act ethically under later capitalism’s globalization of power and the labor process

mhmm pockets of resistance, you know?

 

Hyperlinked:

*virtual hugs*

*virtual snuggles*

*virtual cuddles*

*virtual kisses* *virtual blanket bundles* *virtualhey give me some sheets”* *virtualhey can you scoot over”*

are you the sheet hog or me I can’t remember

we alternate

good equality in all things even in unequal distributions of blanket

#comrades #denofthieves capitalism’s distribution of blankets is uneven we live in the world we create a blanket bundle is a naked manifestation of what marx’s conceptualizations of primitive accumulation thieving blankets is not only the most morally tenable optionit is the only way to act ethically under later capitalism’s globalization of power and the labor process

mhmm pockets of resistance, you know?

With all words replaced by their first listed dictionary definitions, explanations, or identifiers:

Viewable here: hyperlinkchallenge3 because it took up too much space.

 

 

 

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One Response to Hyperlink Challenge

  1. Erica Mena says:

    AHHH! I love this. This is so wonderful! It’s so interesting to me how the actual definition of words are not the meaning of the words in the context of the poem, especially in the case of “virtual” which has such a different meaning for us than it does in the dictionary. I’m curious – how did you deal with definitions that had more than one entry? Did you just always take the first, or did you decide which entry was most aligned with your reading of the word in the context of the poem? Did doing this change your response/reading of the poem? What would it look like to take that third version and make it a “translation” of the poem? Is it already? Would it require editing?

    Like

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