Tag Archives: race

Is to travel getting to or being in a destination?

Mónica de la Torre’s Is to Travel Getting to or Being in a Destination (pp. 259-60) uses travel as a metaphor to preserve writing and history as activity and verb (the “getting to”) as well as noun or finished project (a “destination”). In … Continue reading

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Unseating “The Chair”: Sandy Florian and OUR AUTHOR’s Subject Position

In her essay “Am I Latina? Or Am I Just Angry?” Colombian-Puerto Rican poet Sandy Florian asks important questions about readerly expectations of writers of color and how they write about their identities: What happens, though, when someone who claims to … Continue reading

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Article on light-skinned people in racial justice struggle

Black People Have Every Right to Distrust You For Being Light Skinned

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“Self, black self”: Self-Portraiture and Race

The self-portrait is a popular genre of contemporary poetry as a lyrical expression of how the poet envisions their self. John Keene’s poem “Self” (pg. 95-96 in What I Say) seems to fit this convention, but his poem records an … Continue reading

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2-sided

People frequently use metaphors, euphemisms, and deadpan demeanors to “take the heat off” of potentially distressing subjects. So, what does it mean to “beautifully manage” horror? As a Black, white, and Native American woman, I find it easy, if not almost … Continue reading

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Daffodils and an Empire

In “Interview with an Empire,” M. NourbeSe Philip, seemingly by means of digression, devotes significant space to unpacking the image of daffodil as made famous by the english romantic lyric poet William Wordsworth (see “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud”). … Continue reading

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ZONG! & Sweet Tea

  Writing in the introduction to his oral history of Black gay men in the South, Sweet Tea, E. Patrick Johnson writes, “oral histories… in some ways provide an easier route into the lives of sexual dissidents, especially in the … Continue reading

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