Tag Archives: zong!

Poetic Opacity & Trust

Reading Whereas this week really took me back to thinking about Zong!—for me, both NourbeSe Philip and Long Soldier explore the question of inhabiting language as their central project, and negotiate the use of different languages (not just English, but … Continue reading

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A Visual Response to Zong!

https://goo.gl/kFcoA9 This is a visual response to NourbeSe Philip’s Zong! Reading the spaces in the poems, I was inspired to create a piece that meditates on and examines the texture of space. Each drawing is a meditation on the Gregson … Continue reading

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Is to travel getting to or being in a destination?

Mónica de la Torre’s Is to Travel Getting to or Being in a Destination (pp. 259-60) uses travel as a metaphor to preserve writing and history as activity and verb (the “getting to”) as well as noun or finished project (a “destination”). In … Continue reading

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How important is the author’s intent?

In class when Erica asked if any of us wanted to read our postcards to M. NourbeSe Philip aloud to the class, none of us wanted to. I do not know why others in the class wanted to keep their … Continue reading

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The Personal, Accessibility, and Liberation

As I have worked over the past few years to find ways to better love and care for my friends of color (including my long-term partner), I have largely been guided by a mantra that they have repeated to me … Continue reading

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2-sided

People frequently use metaphors, euphemisms, and deadpan demeanors to “take the heat off” of potentially distressing subjects. So, what does it mean to “beautifully manage” horror? As a Black, white, and Native American woman, I find it easy, if not almost … Continue reading

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How We Survive (Zong!)

Zong! is a bodily text. M. NourbeSe Philip’s work demands of us on a mental/emotional level, but perhaps most readily on a physical level. It performs most actively on the page: its terror lies in its history; its trauma lies … Continue reading

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